Tracking the Tropics: Danielle and Earl pose no threat to Florida

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Hurricane Danielle and Tropical Storm Earl continue spinning over the Atlantic Ocean this evening, though neither pose a threat to the United States. At the moment, the only area of land that could be impacted by either storm is the island of Bermuda, which will likely be east of the center of Tropical Storm Earl later this week.

As of 11 p.m. Monday, the center of Tropical Storm Earl is just more than 300 miles north of the US Virgin Islands, with a forward speed of 7 mph toward the north, pulling it away from the islands. The tropical storm has gotten stronger over the past several hours and is now producing maximum sustained winds of 70 mph, with gusts above hurricane-force at 85 mph. Trailing tropical moisture from the storm will keep the chance for heavy rain active through the night for parts of the Virgin Islands and neighboring Puerto Rico.

Earl will continue moving away from the islands for the next several days, eventually making a northeast turn later this week. At the moment, Bermuda is close to the forecast cone for Earl, but the island will likely end up east of the center of circulation as the storm pulls out to sea. While Earl moves northward, it’s expected to strengthen over warm waters, eventually reaching Category 3 strength by Friday. If it achieves that category, it would become the first major hurricane of 2022 in the Atlantic. Major hurricanes are considered to be any storm that reaches Category 3 strength on the Saffir-Simpson scale, regardless if it impacts any areas of land or not.

Hurricane Danielle continues moving over the open northern Atlantic Ocean. The storm is not a threat to any areas of land.

The only other area of the Atlantic tropics being monitored at the moment is a tropical wave emerging off of western Africa. At the moment, this has low development odds in the next two days but has up to a 60% chance of forming into at least a tropical depression by the end of the week. Right now, the wave is likely to move into the open central Atlantic, meaning any impacts to land appear very low.

Be sure you are prepared by counting on the NBC2 First Alert Hurricane Tracking Team. You can brush up on your tropical weather knowledge using our NBC2 online hurricane guide+ here!

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